PPA Faculty Bios

SLAC Faculty Affairs Contact

Jill Larson
Faculty Affairs Officer

larson@slac.stanford.edu

 

Portrait Tom Abel

Tom Abel, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 29
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-2421
   tabel@slac.stanford.edu
   KIPAC Computational Physics

Education

M.A. 1998, Univ. of Regensburg, Germany; Ph.D. 2000, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich. 

Professional Academic History

Assistant Professor, Pennsylvania State University, 2002-2004; Associate Professor, Pennsylvania State University, 2004; Associate Professor, Physics, SLAC, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, 2004-present; Acting Director, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, 2013-present.

Awards and Honors

Wempe Prize, Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, 2001; CAREER Award, National Science Foundation, 2002; Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science, 2014.

Research Interests

Dr. Abel's research interests are ab initio supercomputer calculations in cosmological and astrophysical systems. He has shown from first principles that the very first luminous objects are very massive stars and has developed novel numerical algorithms using adaptive mesh refinement simulations capturing over 14 orders of magnitude in length and time scales. He currently continues his work on the first stars and first galaxies and their role in chemical enrichment and cosmological reionization. Recently he has also studied relativistic astrophysical flows and magneto-hydrodynamic effects in present day star formation. His research program focuses on building galaxies one star at a time. He heads the KIPAC computational physics department which provides super-computing resources and algorithmic advice to members of KIPAC.

 

 

Portrait Steve Allen

Steve Allen, Associate Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 29
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-3310
   swa@slac.stanford.edu
   X-ray Astronomy and Observational Cosmology (XOC)

Education

Ph.D. Physics, Princeton University, 1991; M.A. Physics, Princeton University, 1986; A.B. Physics, University of Chicago, 1984.

Professional Academic History

PPARC Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of Cambridge, 1994-1996; Research Associate, University of Cambridge, 1996-1999; Royal Society University Research Fellow, University of Cambridge, 1999-2004; Assistant Professor, SLAC and Physics, Stanford University, 2005-2008; Associate Professor, SLAC and Physics, Stanford University, 2008-present.

Awards and Honors

Observational cosmology; X-ray astronomy; galaxy clusters; supermassive black holes; dark matter; dark energy.

 

 

Portrait Dan Akerib

Dan Akerib, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 29
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-4627
   akerib@slac.stanford.edu
   LZ Dark Matter Search

Education

Ph.D. Physics, Princeton University, 1991; M.A. Physics, Princeton University, 1986; A.B. Physics, University of Chicago, 1984.

Professional Academic History

Research Fellow, California Institute of Technology, 1990-1992; Center Fellow, Center for Particle Astrophysics, University of California, Berkeley, 1993-1996; Assistant Professor of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, 1995-2001; Associate Professor of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, 2001-2004; Chair of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, 2007- 2010; Professor of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, 2004-2014; Professor of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, SLAC, Stanford and of Physics, Stanford (by Courtesy), 2014-present.

Awards and Honors

National Science Foundation CAREER Award, 1997; J. Bruce Jackson, M.D., Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Mentoring, CWRU, 2007; Fellow, American Physical Society, 2008; Member, HEPAP, 2010-2012.

Research Interests

Experimental particle astrophysics, dark matter detection, detector R&D.

 

 

Portrait Roger Blandford

Roger Blandford, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 29
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-2606
   rdb@slac.stanford.edu
   Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology

 

Education

M.A. 1998, Univ. of Regensburg, Germany; Ph.D. 2000, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich. Professional Academic History Assistant Professor, Pennsylvania State University, 2002-2004; Associate Professor, Pennsylvania State University, 2004; Associate Professor, Physics, SLAC, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, 2004-present; Acting Director, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, 2013-present.

Professional Academic History

Research Fellow, St. John’s College, Cambridge, 1973-1976; Assistant Professor, California Institute of Technology, 1976-1979; Professor, California Institute of Technology, 1979-1989; Richard Chace Tolman Professor of Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1989-2003; Executive Officer for Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1992-1995; Pehong and Adele Chen Director, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2003-2013; Chair, High Energy Astrophysics Division, American Astronomical Society, 2004-2006; Luke Blossom Professor of Physics, Stanford University and Professor of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, SLAC National Accelerartor Laboratory.

Awards and Honors

Member, Institute for Advanced Study, 1974-1975 and 1998; Alfred P. Sloan Fellow, 1980-1984; Helen B. Warner Prize, American Astronomical Society, 1982; Guggenheim Fellow, 1988-1990; Fellow of Royal Society, 1989; Fellow of American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1993; Dannie Heineman Prize, American Astronomical Society, 1998; Member, American Astronomical Society; Eddington Medal, Royal Astronomical Society, 1999; Member, National Academy of Sciences, 2005; Chair, National Research Council Decadal Survey in Astronomy and Astrophysics, 2009-2011. Awarded the 2016 Crafoord Prize in Astronomy from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

Research Interests

Research interests include cosmology; black hole astrophysics, gravitational lensing; galaxies; cosmic rays; neutron stars; and white dwarfs.

 

 

Portrait Stanley Brodsky

Stanley J. Brodsky, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 29
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-2644
   sjbth@slac.stanford.edu
   Theoretical Physics

Education

B.S., 1961, Physics; Ph.D., 1964, University of Minnesota.

Professional Academic History

Research Assistant, MIT, 1969-1970; Research Associate, MIT, 1970-1971; Junior Visiting Scientist, CERN, 1971-1972; Postdoctoral Research Associate, SLAC, Stanford, 1972-1977; Permanent Staff, SLAC, Stanford, 1977-1989; Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 1989-present.

Awards and Honors

Visiting Professor, Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton University, 1982; AVCO Visiting Professor, Cornell University, 1985; Alexander von Humboldt Distinguished U.S. Senior Scientist Award, 1987; Foreign Scientific Member and External Scientific Director, Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg, 1989-present; Fellow, American Physical Society; Associate Editor, Nuclear Physics B and Nuclear Physics B Proceedings Supplements; Member, Editorial Board, Progress in Particle and Nuclear Physics; President and Co-Founder of the International Light-Cone Advisory Committee; International Advisory Committee, International Workshops on Photon-Photon Collisions; Member, Program Advisory Committee, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 2003-2006; Visiting Professor, Physics Department, College of William and Mary, 2003; Distinguished Fellow at the Thomas Jefferson Laboratory, 2003; Member, Program Advisory Committee, Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI), Darmstadt, Germany 2004-present; Member, Scientific Advisory Board of the Hadron Physics Integrated Infrastructure Initiative of the European Commission, 2006-present; Sackler Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, 2006; Foreign Scientific Member and External Scientific Director of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg; Visiting professorships at the Yang Institute of Theoretical Physics at the State University of New York in Stony Brook, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and the Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology in Durham, England; Member of the LHeC Development Committee to develop an electron-proton and electron-nucleus collider at the LHC; Member, Evaluation Panel for the Excellence Initiative of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaf (DFG); Member of the Science Review Committee of Physics Institutes in Vienna, for the Austrian Academy of Sciences; Recipient of the J.J. Sakurai Prize in Theoretical Physics awarded by the American Physical Society, 2007; Member of the PANDA GSI Experiment and Theory Advisory Panel, 2008-present; Chair and Member of Executive Committee of the Hadron Physics Topical Physics Group (GHP) of the American Physical Society; Hans Christian Andersen Academy Visiting Professor, Center for Particle Physics and Phenomenology CP3-Origins, University of Southern Denmark, 2010-2011; Board Member, Center for Particle Physics and Phenomenology CP3-Origins, 2011-Present; Visiting Schrodinger Professor of Physics, University of Vienna, 2012. Awarded the 2015 International Pomeranchuk Prize from the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics in Moscow, Russia for contributions to the theory of the strong force. Awarded honorary degree of Doctor Scientiarum Honoris Causa by the Faculty of Science at the University of Southern Denmark, 2016.

Research Interests

High-energy theoretical physics, especially the quark-gluon structure of hadrons and novel effects in quantum chromodynamics; fundamental problems in atomic, nuclear, and high energy physics; precision tests of quantum electrodynamics, light-front quantization; nonperturbative and perturbative methods in quantum field theory; applications of AdS/CFT to Quantum Chromodynamics.

 

 

Portrait David L. Burke

David L. Burke, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 29
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-3310
   daveb@slac.stanford.edu
   Dark Energy Survey

Education

B.S., 1971, Physics, Purdue University. Ph.D., 1978, Physics, University of Michigan.

Professional Academic History

Postdoctoral Research Associate, SLAC, Stanford, 1978-1982; Assistant Professor, Physics, SLAC, Stanford, 1982-1988; Associate Professor, Physics, SLAC, Stanford, 1988-1994; Professor, Physics, SLAC 1994-present; Director of SLAC Summer Institute, 1991-2000; Assistant Director, Technical Division, 1994-2005.

Awards and Honors

WFellow, American Physical Society. Distinguished Alumnus, Purdue University.

Research Interests

Experimental and observational cosmology and particle physics; optical astronomy, gravitational lensing, clusters, and large-scale structure.

 

 

portrait Blas Cabrera

Blas Cabrera, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 29
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-3310
   cabrera@slac.stanford.edu
   Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS)

Education

B.S., 1968, University of Virginia, Ph.D., 1975, Stanford University

Professional Academic History

Research Associate, Stanford University, 1975-79; Senior Research Associate, Stanford University, 1979-80; Acting Assistant Professor, Physics Department, Stanford University, 1980-81; Assistant Professor, Stanford University, 1981-84; Associate Professor, Stanford University, 1984-91; Professor, Stanford University, 1991-present; Stanford Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching, 1990; Fellow of the American Physical Society, 1996; Stanley G. Wojcicki Professorship, 2011.

Awards and Honors

National Bureau of Standards Precision Measurement Grant 1978-81; Committee on Fundamental Constants of National Research Council 1983-7; NSF Advisory Committee on Cosmology 1988; Stanford University Fellow 1988-89, 1989-90; Stanford Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching, 1990; Advisory Panel for Electronics and Electrical Engineering at NIST (formally NBS), 1991-3; Senate of Academic Council, Stanford University, 1991-92. 2007- ; Visiting Scholar Appointment at Balliol College, Oxford University, 1992-93; Fellow of American Physical Society (1996); Chair of Stanford Physics Department 1996-99; School of Humanities & Sciences Appointments and Promotions Committee, 1998-2000; Chair of Varian 2 Building Committee 2003- ; Deputy Director of Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory (HEPL) 2003-present; W.K.H. Panofsky Prize in Experimental Particle Physics, 2013.

Research Interests

  • Experimental Particle Physics
  • Experimental Condensed Matter
  • Experimental Particle Astrophyiscs
  • Specialty: Low temperature particle detectors

 

 

 

Portrait Alex Chao

Alexander Wu Chao, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 29
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-2985
   achao@slac.stanford.edu
   FEL and Beam Physics

Education

B.S., 1970, Physics, National Tsing-Hua University, Taiwan. Ph.D., 1974, Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook.

Professional Academic History

Research Associate, SLAC, 1974 - 1976. Experimental Physicist, SLAC, 1976 - 1984. Senior Scientist, SSC, Central Design Group, 1984 - 1989. Senior Scientist, SSC Laboratory, 1989 - 1994. Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 1994 - present. Adjunct Professor, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, Department of Physics, 1991 - present.

Awards and Honors

Fellow, American Physical Society, 1989; Academician, Academia Sinica,Taiwan, 2002; Outstanding alumni, Tsinghua University, 2002; European Physical Society, Wideroe Prize, 2008.

Research Interests

Accelerator physics; nonlinear beam dynamics; collective instabilities of high intensity beams; polarization effects beam-beam interaction in storage rings; advanced acceleration schemes.

 

 

Portrait Lance Dixon

Lance J. Dixon, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 29
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-2627
   lance@slac.stanford.edu
   Theoretical Physics

Education

B.S., 1982, Physics and Applied Mathematics, California Institute of Technology. M.A., 1983, Physics; Ph.D., 1986, Physics, Princeton University.

Professional Academic History

Postdoctoral Fellow, SLAC, Stanford, 1986-1987; Assistant Professor, Princeton University, 1987-1989; Visiting Professor, Stanford, 1988-1989; Panofsky Fellow, SLAC, Stanford, 1989-1992.; Associate Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 1992-1998; Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 1998-present; Chair, SLAC PPA Faculty, 2011 - 2014.

Awards and Honors

Fellow, American Physical Society, 1995; Outstanding Referee, American Physical Society, 2008; APS J.J. Sakurai Prize for Theoretical Particle Physics, 2014.

Research Interests

Theoretical particle physics: properties of scattering amplitudes in guage theory and gravity; perturbative QCD and collider physics.

 

 

Portrait John Galayda

John Galayda, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 29
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-2371
   galayda@slac.stanford.edu
   Accelerator Physics

Education

B.A., 1970, Lehigh University; Ph.D., 1977, Rutgers University.

Professional Academic History

Assistant Physicist, National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1977- 1979; Associate (Project) Physicist, National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1979- 1984; Group Leader, Diagnostics Group, National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1984- 1985; Section Head, Computer/Controls/Diagnostics Section, National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1985- 1987; Associate Chairman for Accelerators, National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1987- 1990; Director of the Accelerator Systems Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 1990- 1999; Deputy Associate Laboratory Director, Advance Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 1999- 2001; Director, LCLS Construction Project, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2001- Present; Professor of Photon Science and PPA, SLAC, Stanford, 2005 – present.

Awards and Honors

Elected to Phi Beta Kappa, 1970; RandD Award for global feedback orbit control, 1989; Elected Fellow of the American Physical Society, 1996; FEL Prize, 2012; APS Robert R. Wilson Prize for Achievement in the Physics of Particle Accelerators, 2013.

Research Interests

Manipulation and control of electron beams using laser light, the characteristics of synchrotron radiation from an FEL and beam-based feedback stabilization systems. The last topic is relevant to light sources based on storage rings and energy recover linacs as well as to FELs.

 

 

Portrait JoAnne L. Hewett

JoAnne L. Hewett, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 29
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-4424
   hewett@slac.stanford.edu
   Theoretical Physics

Education

B.S., 1982, Physics and Mathematics; Ph.D., 1988, Iowa State University.

Professional Academic History

Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1988-1991; Assistant Physicist, Argonne National Laboratory, 1991-1993; Assistant Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 1994-2002; Associate Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 2002-2008; Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 2008-present.

Research Interests

Theoretical particle physics; phenomenology of electroweak interactions within and beyond the Standard Model, collider signatures and effects in rare processes. Heavy flavor physics. Signature of extra spacetime dimensions.

 

 

Portrait Norbert Holtkamp

Norbert Holtkamp, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 29
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-7449
   norbert.holtkamp@slac.stanford.edu
   Accelerator Physics

Education

Theses of Diploma in Physics, Freie Universitaet of Berlin, 1987; Ph.D. in Physics, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany, 1990.

Professional Academic History

Research Staff, Berliner Elektronenspeicherring Gesellschaft für Synchrotronstrahlung (BESSY GMbH), 1987-1988; Research Associate, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 1990-1992; Sabbatical at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), 1991; Head of the Research Group responsible for the development of a normal conducting Linear Collider concept (S-Band Linear Collider), and Department Head for Linear Accelerators, Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg, 1992-1998; Senior Staff, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Muon Collider/Neutrino factory research, Linear Colliders, Main Injector Commissioning and Operation, 1998-2000; Division Director, Accelerator Systems, Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 2001-2006; Principal Deputy Director General, ITER Organization (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), Cadarache, 2006-2010; Professor, PPA (Particle Physics and Astrophysics) and Photon Science, 2010-present; Director, Accelerator Directorate, SLAC, 2010-present; Deputy Director, SLAC, 2013-present.

Awards and Honors

Member of the American Physical Society, 1999-present; Fellow of the APS, 2007 – present; Member of IEEE, 2001-present; Senior Member IEEE, 2005-present; Award for outstanding technical leadership in the Science and Technology area from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 2004; Member of European Physical Society (EPS), 2006-present; EPS-AG Gersh Budker Prize, 2008.

Research Interests

  • Electromagnetic eigenmodes in accelerating structures used for charged particle acceleration
  • Higher Order Modes (HOMs) in accelerating structures and their impact on beams
  • Muon accelerator methods
  • Normal- and Superconducting accelerator technology
  • How power proton beams, related beam diagnostics and application
  • Industrial application of accelerators
  • Electron storage rings, Synchrotron light sources and FELs
  • The Energy Challenge, fusion devices and plasma physics
  • Science on an international scale

 

 

 

Portrait Zhirong Huang

Zhirong Huang, Associate Professor

Accelerator Directorate

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 26
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-3947
   zrh@slac.stanford.edu
   Accelerator Research

Education

B.S. California Institute of Technology, 1992; Ph.D. Physics, Stanford University, 1998.

Professional Academic History

Assistant Physicist, Argonne National Lab 1998 – 2001; Physicist, Argonne National Lab 2001-2002; Staff Scientist, SLAC 2002 – 2011; FEL Physics Group Leader, SLAC 2010 – 2011; FEL R&D Program Leader, SLAC 2011 – Present; Senior Staff Scientist, SLAC 2011 – 2012; Associate Professor, Photon Science and PPA, SLAC and Stanford University, 2013 – Present.

Awards and Honors

Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Research in Beam Physics Award 1999; Department of Energy Secretary’s Appreciation Award for LCLS Commissioning 2010; US Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) Prize for Achievement in Accelerator Physics and Technology 2011. 2015 APS (American Physical Society) Fellowship for 'outstanding contributions to the theoretical development and experimental verification of high-gain x-ray free-electron lasers operating as seeded and SASE amplifiers.

Research Interests

  • High-brightness electron and photon beams
  • X-ray free-electron lasers and applications
  • Beam-radiation interactions in accelerator systems
  • Advanced acceleration and radiation generation concepts

 

 

 

Portrait Kent Irwin

Kent Irwin, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 29
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-5534
   kdirwin@slac.stanford.edu

Education

M.S. 1995, Stanford University; Ph.D. 1995, Stanford University.

Professional Academic History

Postdoctoral Researcher, NIST, 1995-1996; Physicist, NIST, 1996-2002; Supervisory Physicist, NIST, 2002-2007; Professor Adjoint, Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences, Univ. of Colorado, 2006-2013; NIST Fellow, 2007-2013; Professor of Physics and of Particle Physics and Astrophysics and Photon Science at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2013 – present.

Awards and Honors

Arthur S. Flemming Award, George Washington University, 2006; Joseph F. Keithley Award, American Physical Society, 2007; Fellow, American Physical Society, 2007; Department of Commerce Gold Medal, DOC, 2012.

Research Interests

Experiments to probe the nature of dark matter and dark energy, gravity at large scales, the mass and number of neutrino species, the characteristics of inflation and the cosmic gravity wave background, and the evolution of structure and disposition of baryonic matter in the universe.

 

 

Portrait John Jaros

John A. Jaros, Professor, Emeritus

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 43
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-2852
   john@slac.stanford.edu
   Linear Collider Detector

Education

B.S., 1968, Physics, MIT. Ph.D., 1975, Physics, University of California, Berkeley.

Professional Academic History

Research Associate, SLAC, Stanford, 1975-1979; Assistant Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 1979-1984; Associate Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 1984-1990; Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 1990-present; Chair, SLAC HEP Faculty, 2001-2005.

Awards and Honors

Fellow, American Physical Society; Panofsky Prize, American Physical Society, 2006.

Research Interests

Experimental particle physics: precision vertex detection, heavy quark and lepton lifetimes and mixing; searches for millicharged particles; physics studies, detector R&D, and design studies for the Linear Collider Detector.

 

 

 

 

 

Portrait Steve Kahn

Steven M. Kahn, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 29
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-4622
   skahn@slac.stanford.edu
   Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)

Education

A.B., Physics, 1975, Columbia University, Ph.D., 1980, University of California, Berkeley.

Professional Academic History

Assistant Professor of Physics, Columbia University, 1982-1984; Assistant Professor of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, 1983-1987; Associate Professor of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, 1987-1990; Associate Professor of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, 1989-1990; Professor of Physics and Astronomy, 1990-1998, University of California, Berkeley; Professor of Physics, Columbia University, 1995- 2001; I.I. Rabi Professor of Physics, Columbia University, 2001-2003; Professor of Physics (Stanford) and PPA (SLAC), and Deputy Director, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2003-present; Principal Investigator for U.S. participation, XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer, 1987-present.

Awards and Honors

Elected to Fellowship, American Physical Society, 1991. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS), 2012.

Research Interests

Engaged in a diverse program of research in high energy astrophysics, including experimental, observational, and theoretical components. Research interests include work in high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, and experimental cosmology.

 

 

Portrait Chao-Lin Kuo

Chao-Lin Kuo, Associate Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 29
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-5301
   clkuo@slac.stanford.edu
   X-ray Astronomy and Observational Cosmology (XOC)

Education

B.S., Physics, National Taiwan University, 1994; Ph.D., Astrophysics, U.C. Berkeley, 2003.

Professional Academic History

Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), National Research Council postdoctoral fellow; Senior Postdoctoral Scholar, California Institute of Technology; Assistant Professor of Physics, Stanford, and SLAC, 2008-present.

Awards and Honors

Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship 2009.

Research Interests

Professor Chao-Lin Kuo's group studies the most ancient light, the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, emitted when the universe was in its infancy. The polarization in the CMB contains information on the birth of the universe (Inflation), as well as its subsequent evolution. Professor Kuo is involved in both the cosmological interpretation and instrumentation/technology development. The group frequently adopts advanced experimental techniques, such as cryogenics, superconductivity, and low-noise measurements, to maximize detector's sensitivity to the faint CMB signal. The ongoing projects are all CMB polarization experiments based at the South Pole: • BICEP/BICEP2/Keck Array: A series of degree-scale experiments targeting signatures of primordial gravitational waves with increasing sensitivity. • POLAR-1/POLAR Array: Few-arcminute-scale polarization experiments targeting both gravitational waves and gravitational lensing signatures. Professor Kuo was awarded an MRI (Major Research Instrumentation) grant from the NSF in 2010 to develop POLAR-1.

 

 

Portrait David MacFarlane

David Brian MacFarlane, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 60
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-3406
   dbmacf@slac.stanford.edu
   SLAC BaBar

Education

B.A.Sc. (honors), 1978, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; Ph.D., 1984, California Institute of Technology.

Professional Academic History

Research Assistant, California Institute of Technology, 1979-1983; Research Associate, University of Toronto, 1983-1987; Research Fellow, McGill University, 1987-1995; Assistant Professor, McGill University, 1987-1990; Associate Professor, McGill University, 1990-1993; Professor, McGill University, 1993-1997; Visiting Physicist, SLAC, 1993-1997; E.W.R. Steacie Memorial Fellow, McGill University and SLAC; Professor, University of California at San Diego, 1997-2005; Professor, SLAC, 2005-present; Assistant Director, Elementary Particle Physics Research, 2006-2010. Dep. Director, PPA Directorate, 2007-2009; Director, PPA Directorate, 2009-present.

Awards and Honors

Herzberg Medal, Canadian Association of Physicists, 1991; Fellow of E. W. R. Steacie Memorial, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, 1994; Fellow of American Physical Society, Rutherford Memorial Medal, Royal Society of Canada, 1995.

Research Interests

Experimental particle physics.

 

 

Portrait Jogesh Pati

Jogesh Pati, Visiting Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 81
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-4434
   pati@slac.stanford.edu
   Theoretical Physics

Education

B.Sc., (Honors), Ravenshaw College, Utkal University, India 1955; M.Sc., Delhi University, 1957; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1961.

Professional Academic History

Research Assistant in Physics, University of Maryland, 1957-60; Richard C. Tolman Postdoctoral Fellow, Calif. Institute Technology, 1960-62; Member, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, 1962-63; Assistant Professor, University of Maryland, 1963-67; Associate Professor, University of Maryland, 1967-73; Professor, University of Maryland, 1973-2005; Professor Emeritus of Physics, University of Maryland, 2005; Visiting Professor, SLAC, Stanford University, 2005-Present.

Awards and Honors

Richard C. Tolman Postdoctoral Fellow, Calif. Institute of Technology (1960-1962); Washington Academy of Sciences Award in Physical Sciences, 1973; Fellow, Washington Academy of Sciences; John Simon Guggenheim Fellow, 1979-80; Fellow, American Physical Society; Distinguished Scholar-Teacher, University of Maryland, 1986-87; General Res. Board Semester Res. Awards, Univ. of Maryland (1978, 1983, 1987); Schrodinger Visiting Professor, University of Vienna, 1988; Scientist of the Year Award by the American Chapter of the Indian Physics Association (1991); Distinguished Scientist Award by the Association of Indians in America, Washington Chapter (1998); Fellow, the National Academy of Sciences, India; Birla Visiting Professor, Birla Science Center, Hyderabad, India (1995); Senior Fellow, Japan Society for Promotion of Sciences (1994-95); Distinguished Faculty Research Award, Univ. of Maryland (1997-98); Distinguished Homi J. Bhabha Chaired Professorship, Awarded by the Govt. of India (1999-); The Dirac Medal and the Prize for the Year 2000, awarded by the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy, for “Pioneering Contributions Towards Quest for Unification”.

Research Interests

Prof. Jogesh Pati has made pioneering contributions towards the notion of a unification of fundamental particles - quarks and leptons - and of their gauge forces: weak, electromagnetic and strong. His formulation, carried out in collaboration with Abdus Salam, of the original gauge theory of quark-lepton unification, and their resulting insight that violations of baryon and lepton numbers, especially that would manifest in proton decay, are likely consequences of such a unification, provide corner stones of modern particle physics today. The suggestions of Pati and Salam of the symmetry of SU(4)-color, left-right symmetry and of the associated existence of the right-handed neutrinos now provide some of the crucial ingredients for understanding the observed masses of the neutrinos and their oscillations. For his pioneering contributions towards a "Quest for Unification", he received the Dirac Medal for the year 2000 (with Howard Georgi and Helen Quinn).

 

 

Portrait Michael Peskin

Michael E. Peskin, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 81
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-3250
   peskin@slac.stanford.edu
   Theoretical Physics

Education

B.A., 1973, Chemistry and Physics, Harvard University. Ph.D., 1978, Physics, Cornell University.

Professional Academic History

Junior Fellow, Society of Fellows, Harvard University, 1977-1980; Visiting Scientist, DPhT, Centre D'Études Nucléaires, France, 1979-1980; Visiting Assistant Professor, Physics, Cornell University, 1980-1982; Associate Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 1982-1986; Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 1986-present.

Awards and Honors

Fellow, American Physical Society.

Research Interests

Theoretical high-energy physics. Models of symmetry-breaking in the electroweak interactions, including models with supersymmetry, new dimensions of space, and other properties of superstring theory. Methods for experimental tests of these models, especially at future e+e- colliders.

 

 

Portrait Tor Raubenheimer

Tor Raubenheimer, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 66
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-2474
   tor@slac.stanford.edu
   Accelerator Research

Education

B.S., 1985, Physics/Computer Science, Dartmouth College. Ph.D., 1992, Applied Physics, Stanford.

Professional Academic History

Research Associate, SLAC, 1991-1994; Panofsky Fellow, SLAC, 1994-1997; Visiting associate scientist, CERN, 1996-1997; Assistant Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 1997-2001; Associate Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 2001-2008. Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 2008-present.

Awards and Honors

American Physical Society, Division of Beam Physics, Dissertation Award 1994. U.S. Particle Accelerator School Prize for Achievement in Accelerator Physics and Technology, 2001. Fellow, American Physical Society, 2001.

Research Interests

Accelerator physics; design issues in next generation linear colliders; participation in SLC operation; ion/beam-plasma instabilities in rings and linacs; effects during bunch length compression.

 

 

Portrait: Aaron Roodman

Aaron J. Roodman, Professor (Chair, PPA Faculty)

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 29
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-2705
   roodman@slac.stanford.edu
   Dark Energy Survey

Education

B.S.,1985 California Institute of Technology; Ph.D., 1991, University of Chicago.

Professional Academic History

Research Associate, University of Chicago, 1991-1994; Research Scientist, University of Chicago, 1994-1998; Assistant Professor, SLAC PPA, Stanford, 1998-2005; Associate Professor, SLAC PPA, Stanford, 2005-2012; Professor, SLAC PPA, Stanford, 2012-present; Chair, SLAC PPA Faculty, 2009-2011 and 2015 - present; Deputy Director, KIPAC, 2011- present.

Awards and Honors

Elected to Fellowship, American Physical Society, 2013

Research Interests

Dark Energy, Wide-field optical surveys, Active Optics, Observational Cosmology with the Dark Energy Survey and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

 

 

Portrait Rafe Schindler

Rafe H. Schindler, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 29
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-3450
   rafe@slac.stanford.edu
   The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)

Education

B.A., 1974, Physics and Applied Mathematics, University of Rochester. M.A., 1975, Physics; Ph.D., 1979, Physics, Stanford.

Professional Academic History

Research Associate, SLAC, Stanford, 1979-1980; Research Associate, CERN, 1980-1982; Senior Research Fellow, California Institute of Technology, 1982-1985; Assistant Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 1985-1991; Associate Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 1991-1997; Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 1997-present.

Research Interests

High energy e+e- particle physics: Upsilon spectroscopy and decay with the BABAR detector. Experimental particle astrophysics: Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). Instrumentation and technology interests: Development of a wide field mid-infrared imager for DES. Engineering and development of the LSST imager system.

 

 

Portrait Philip Shuster

Philip Schuster, Associate Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 81
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-5180
   schuster@slac.stanford.edu

Education

Ph.D., 2007, Physics, Harvard University.

Professional Academic History

Postdoctoral Scholar, Theory Group, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2007 – 2010; Junior Faculty, Perimeter Institute, 2010 – 2015; Faculty, Perimeter Institute, 2015 – present; Member, Institute for Advanced Study School of Natural Sciences, Princeton, 2011; Associate Professor, PPA faculty, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, and Stanford University, 2015 – present.

Awards and Honors

Discovery Accelerator Award, NSERC, 2012; Ontario Early Researcher Award, 2015; 2015 New Horizons in Physics Prize, Nov 2014.

Research Interests

Dr. Schuster’s interests include the theoretical underpinnings of the Standard Model, identifying dark matter and its properties, and new experimental tests of physics beyond the Standard Model. He has worked on LHC collider physics and methods of characterizing data, new models of weak-scale physics and dark matter, and is exploring various theoretical aspects of long-range forces and scattering amplitudes. He is also a co-spokesperson for APEX and a member of the Heavy Photon Search experiment, both searching for hidden sector photons that could mediate dark matter interactions. Schuster’s latest work includes investigating the design and physics of a high rate electron fixed-target missing momentum dark matter experiment to probe GeV-scale thermal relic dark matter.

 

 

Portrait Ariel Schwartzman

Ariel Schwartzman, Associate Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 95
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-2678
   sch@slac.stanford.edu
   ATLAS at SLAC

Education

M.S., 1998, Physics; Ph.D., 2003, University of Buenos Aires.

Professional Academic History

R.H. Dicke Postdoctoral Fellow, Princeton University (DØ Experiment, Fermilab), 2003-2006; W. Panofsky Fellow (ATLAS Experiment, CERN), 2006- 2008; Assistant Professor of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, SLAC and Stanford University, 2008-2015; Associate Professor of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, SLAC and Stanford University, 2015 - Present.

Research Interests

Experimental high energy physics with an emphasis on jets, missing transverse energy, b-tagging; high level trigger b-tagging; pixel detector calibration and DAQ.

 

 

Portrain Leonardo Senatore

Leonardo Senatore, Associate Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 29
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-3408
   senatore@slac.stanford.edu
   KIPAC Theory

Education

Laurea in Theoretical Physics, University of Pisa, 2002; Final Diploma in Physics, Scuola Normale Superiore of Pisa, 2003; Ph.D. in Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2006.

Professional Academic History

Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Astrophysics, Harvard University, 2006-2010; Postdoctoral Fellow, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, 2006-2010; Assistant Professor, Physics (Stanford University) and Particle Physics and Astrophysics (SLAC), 2010-present.

Research Interests

Research focus is on particle physics and the very early Universe, the period right after the Big Bang; development of an effective field theory to describe inflation; identifying signatures of inflation that might be probed with experiments. Other research interests have included the development of improved techniques for the analysis of the cosmological data, as well as improving our understanding of eternal inflation.

 

 

Portrait Tom Shutt

Tom Shutt, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 29
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-3709
   tshutt@slac.stanford.edu
   Theoretical Physics

Education

Ph.D. Physics, UC Berkeley (1993); B.S. Physics, Texas A & M (1986).

Professional Academic History

Research Fellow, Center for Particle Astrophysics, U.C. Berkeley, 1993-1998; Assistant Professor, Dept. of Physics, Princeton University, 1998-2005; Associate Professor and Agnar Pytte Chair, Case Western Reserve University, 2005-2009; Professor and Agnar Pytte Chair, Case Western Reserve University, 2009-2014; Professor of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, SLAC and Stanford University, 2014-present.

Professional Activities

Spokesperson, LZ experiment, 2012-present; Co-spokesperson, LUX collaboration, 2007-2012; Member, HEPAP 2013-present.

Research Interests

Experimental particle astrophysics, dark matter detection, neutrino astrophysics, development of advanced instrumentation for fundamental physics.

 

 

 

 

 

Portrait Su Dong

Su Dong, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 95
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-2284
   sudong@slac.stanford.edu
   ATLAS at SLAC

Education

B.S., 1983, Physics; Ph.D., 1987, Physics, Imperial College, London University.

Professional Academic History

Research Associate, High Energy Physics Institute, Beijing, China, 1987-1988; Research Associate, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, 1988-1993; Research Associate, SLAC, Stanford, 1993-1996; Assistant Professor, SLAC PPA, Stanford, 1997-2003; Associate Professor, SLAC PPA, Stanford 2004-2011; Professor, SLAC PPA, Stanford, 2011-present.

Research Interests

Experimental particle physics at ATLAS with emphasis on search for new physics beyond the Standard Model through b-jet signatures in particular. Previous experimental experience in BaBar, SLD and TASSO on physics related to heavy flavors and associated techniques such as trigger and b-tagging. Experimental instrumentation interests include pixel vertex detectors, tracking systems, and trigger and DAQ systems.

 

 

Portrain Hiroshima Tanaka

Hirohisa A. Tanaka, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 94
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-5119
   tanaka@slac.stanford.edu
   Neutrino Group

Education

A.B. 1997, Physics and Mathematics, Harvard University; Ph.D. 2002, Physics, Stanford University

Professional Academic History

Undergraduate Research Assistant, Harvard University High Energy Physics Laboratory, 1994-1997; Graduate Research Assistant, SLAC Group C, 1997-2002 Research Associate/Scholar, Princeton University, Department of Physics, 2003-2007; Assistant/Associate Professor, University of British Columbia, 2007-2015 Research Scientist/Principal Research Scientist, Institute of Particle Physics, 2007-2018; Visiting Professor, Kyoto University, 2008; Associate Professor/Professor University of Toronto, Department of Physics, 2015-2018; Professor, SLAC, Stanford University, 2018

Awards and Honors

Fellow, Division of Particle and Fields, American Physical Society; International Advisory Committee, Next Generation Neutrino and Nucleon Decay Detectors Workshop Series; International Advisory Committee, International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics; Scientific Program Committee, International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and Future Neutrino Facilities; Invitation Fellowship for Research in Japan, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science; Thomas Temple Hoopes Prize, Harvard University; Head Organizer, Institute of Nuclear Theory workshops on Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions; Co-chair, International Workshop on Neutrino Nucleus interactions; Co-chair, International Symposium on Lepton Photon Interactions; Scientific Council, Institute of Particle Physics; ICFA Panel on Long Baseline Neutrino Experiments and Neutrino Factories; Physics Advisory Committee, Fermilab; Experimental Advisory Committee, SNOLAB; Steering Group for Five Year Plan, TRIUMF; Planning and Policy Advisory Committee, TRIUMF.

Research Interests

Experimental particle physics; Probing neutrino properties through neturino oscillations and interactions; Searches for dark matter and other exotic particles

 

 

Portrait Sami G. Tantawi

Sami G. Tantawi, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 26
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-4454
   tantawi@slac.stanford.edu
   Advanced Accelerator Research

Education

B.Sc. Electrical Engineering , Cairo University , Giza, Egypt, 1984 M.Sc. Electrical Engineering, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt, 1987. Ph.D. Electrical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, 1992.

Professional Academic History

Research Staff Member, SLAC, Stanford, 1992-2002; Assistant Professor, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt, 1994-1996; Associate Professor, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt, 2000-2002; Associate Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 2002-2012; Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 2012 - present.

Awards and Honors

U.S. Particle Accelerator School Prize for Achievement in Accelerator Physics and Technology, 2003; Fellow, American Physical Society.

Research Interests

High power rf systems and components for advanced particle accelerators, in particular high gradient accelerator for future linear colliders.

 

 

Portrait Risa Wechsler

Risa Wechsler, Professor

Particle Physics and Astrophysics

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road MS 29
Menlo Park, CA 94025

   (650) 926-3310
   risa@slac.stanford.edu
   KIPAC Theory

Education

S.B., 1996, Physics, MIT; Ph.D. 2001, Physics, UC Santa Cruz.

Professional Academic History

Research Fellow, University of Michigan, 2001-2003; Hubble Fellow, University of Chicago, Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, 2003-2006; Assistant Professor, Stanford Physics, SLAC, KIPAC, 2006-2013; Associate Professor, Stanford Physics, SLAC, KIPAC, 2013 - present.

Awards and Honors

Fermi Fellowship, Enrico Fermi Institute, 2003 – 2005; Hubble Fellowship, NASA/STScI, 2003 – 2006; Arthur H. Compton Lecturer, Enrico Fermi Institute, Spring 2005; Terman Fellow, Stanford, 2006-2008; Hellman Faculty Scholar, Stanford, 2008.

Research Interests

Theoretical Cosmology and Astrophysics; Galaxy formation and properties, large-scale structure, galaxy clusters, history and structure of dark-matter halos, cosmological constraints, dark matter and dark energy.